Hoodle-Doodle Bird
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Paper Cranes for Peace

Geranium_nov

Geraniums on the Window Sill / New Jersey / Nov. 06

It's the last day of November and yet the geranium is still blooming (this one is inside on the window sill, but I've seen them still blooming outside). Interestingly, when I looked up the origins of the word "geranium" I found this:

1548, from L. geranium, from Gk. geranion, dim. of geranos "crane" (cognate with L. grus, Eng. crane), from supposed resemblance of seed pods to cranes' bills; the native name was also cranebill.

The word "cranberry" comes from crane, too:

1647, Amer.Eng. adaptation of Low Ger. kraanbere, from kraan "crane" + M.L.G. bere "berry," perhaps from a resemblance between the plants' stamens and the beaks of cranes. 

In some cultures the crane is associated with a celebration of peace and prayers for those who are lost in war. According to a Japanese tradition, if you fold 1000 origami cranes your wish for health will be granted. And because of a young girl in Japan (Sadako Sasaki), paper cranes have also become an international symbol of peace.

Learn how to make your own origami paper cranes (Paper Cranes: Step-by-Step Instructions).

Comments

how do ypu make theM??

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